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What Dogs Know About Wonder

It is said that human beings are distinguished from other animals by our knowledge of our own mortality. As far as distinctions go, that one kind of sucks. It does remind me, though, that we can learn a lot from animals—particularly dogs. They lead their doggie lives blissfully unaware they'll be garden fertilizer before too … Continue reading What Dogs Know About Wonder

Can Men Be Trusted With PSA Screening?

My daughter is reading Barbara Ehrenreich’s book Natural Causes for a sociology course in college. This week she’s been home for Spring break, catching up on her sleep and getting ahead on course reading. Now, my daughter knows I have strong opinions on prostate cancer screening, so it was a significant moment when she set … Continue reading Can Men Be Trusted With PSA Screening?

The Anxiety of Influence and Getting Over Yourself

Mostly I blame T. S. Eliot, though he’s not the only one. There’s Charles Dickens and James Baldwin, too. I could come up with lots more culprits, but there’s no need. The effect is the same. These are some of the writers whose work most inspires me. Yet the same extraordinary talents that produced The … Continue reading The Anxiety of Influence and Getting Over Yourself

“Captain Obvious” Advice for Your Prostate Health

Every now and then I see my wife, a professor of 19th-century British literature, reading a new lit-crit article with a title like "String Theory in Browning's 'Fra Lippo Lippi.'" That's when I remark that everything worth saying about literature was written before 1950. I realize, of course, that's snarky nonsense. Sometimes, though, it seems … Continue reading “Captain Obvious” Advice for Your Prostate Health

It’s Not You—It’s That Hip Injury

You may have noticed I've been a little distant lately. It's not for lack of caring, I promise. It's odd. We've both stayed put but we don't connect like we used to. Sometimes I see you from a distance and it reminds me how long it's been since we spent time together. I get this … Continue reading It’s Not You—It’s That Hip Injury

15 Things I Learned When I Sold My Business—Part 3

This post is the final installment in a three-part article begun with 15 Things I Learned When I Sold My Business and continued in Part 2. In each, I recap insights I shared in a 2006 presentation to McMurry staff after selling my firm, Redspring Communications. Part 1 focused on building a business and readying it for sale. … Continue reading 15 Things I Learned When I Sold My Business—Part 3

Twitter’s “Private” Rooms

My older brother once remarked that social media is the largest social experiment in history—and that we won’t appreciate its impact for years. He’s a brilliant, scientifically-minded guy who observes life with the detachment of a benevolent deity. In his mid-60s, he enjoys an enviable serenity of mind. He doesn’t feel an urgency to adapt … Continue reading Twitter’s “Private” Rooms

15 Things I Learned When I Sold My Business—Part 2

This post is a continuation of my earlier article, 15 Things I Learned When I Sold My Business. In it, I recap insights I shared in a 2006 presentation to McMurry staff after selling my firm, Redspring Communications. Part One focused on building a business and readying it for sale. Here I continue the discussion by looking … Continue reading 15 Things I Learned When I Sold My Business—Part 2

Why I’ll Never Shoot Another AR-15

The AR-15 rifle, with its unmistakable, nasty-looking contours has become the poster child of the gun debate. Gun control advocates demonize the rifle as much, I think, for its lethal appearance as for its ability to kill people. Meanwhile, gun enthusiasts and the NRA talk like they’d sooner lose limbs than part with their tricked-out … Continue reading Why I’ll Never Shoot Another AR-15

Prostate Cancer and “the art of aging”

Excellent post from Michael Glode MD on prostate cancer and aging.

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As all of us septuagenarians (and probably octogenarians) know, and as Gilda Radner entitled her book, “It’s always something.” In it, she goes on to say, “I wanted a perfect ending. Now I’ve learned, the hard way, that some poems don’t rhyme, and some stories don’t have a clear beginning, middle, and end. Life is about not knowing, having to change, taking the moment and making the best of it, without knowing what’s going to happen next. Delicious Ambiguity.”

For most prostate cancer patients, the challenges presented by that diagnosis occur at a time of life when one is forced to admit that the sprained ankle doesn’t heal as fast, gray hairs are appearing, and/or your hairline is receding (or the bald patch growing), and there may indeed…

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